Bye, Bye, Browser Bar

The Web browser toolbar was for many years the way that expert researchers improved their Web browser.    It provided nice added features (term jumping, highlighting) and saved search history.    Google had one, Yahoo! had one, in fact nearly everyone who could do so created one.    Some were little more than advertisements.   …

Research Add-ons Chart for Lawyers Using IE, Chrome, Firefox, and Safari

This page was inspired by a recent conference presentation I saw that focused, like much of this blog, on extensions and tweaks for Mozilla’s Firefox or Google’s Chrome Web browsers.  The legal profession is predominantly using the Microsoft Internet Explorer browser, however, probably at even greater levels than the general population.  It is sometimes hard …

Bookmark Synching

Bookmark synchronizing can be an important tool for any lawyer managing online information.  As soon as you use more than one Web browser or more than one device, you may want to have access to the same bookmarks, no matter what software you have open.  I’ve covered both Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, the two …

Good Bye to XMarks. Sync with Your Browser Instead

While Microsoft’s Internet Explorer retains a lead in the marketplace due to corporate inertia, it is losing one of its best add-ons.  XMarks was popular as a bookmark synchronization tool that worked in all major Web browsers.  But Firefox has added Sync, the extension formerly known as Weave, and Google Chrome is funneling full synchronization …

Rocking the Old School Research Extensions for IE

Microsoft’s Internet Explorer continues to lag behind other Web browsers in providing tools for research.  I revisited two free IE add-ons from the first half of this decade that can provide some enhancements to your Internet Explorer-based research.  While they have some quirks and limitations that reflect their datedness, IE users may still find them …